norge.ru - All Norway in russian
/History Your language:
    Russian|English|Norsk
Back  
 News of server
 On Norway
 History of country
 Culture
 Oslo 1000 years
 Person of month
 Journey
 Discussion
 Map of country
 Study of language
 Searching
 References
 Developers
 Feedback
 
 
 

Advertisment on server
  History

Famous names
Earliest peoples

The earliest traces of human occupation in Norway are found along the coast, where the huge ice shelf of the last ice age first melted between 11,000 and 8000 BC. The oldest finds are stone tools dating from 9500 to 6000 BC, discovered in Finnmark in the north and Rogaland in the southwest. Theories of a Komsa type of stone-tool culture north of the Arctic Circle and a Fosna type from Trondelag to Oslo Fjord were rendered obsolete in the 1970s. More recent finds along the entire coast revealed to archaeologists that the difference between the two can simply be ascribed to different types of tools and not to different cultures. Coastal fauna provided a means of livelihood for fishermen and hunters, who may have made their way along the southern coast about 10,000 BC when the interior was still covered with ice. It is now thought that these so-called Arctic peoples came from the south and followed the coast northward considerably later. Some may have come along the ice-free coast of the Kola Peninsula, but the evidence of this is still poor.

In the southern part of the country are dwelling sites dating from about 5000 BC. Finds from these sites give a clearer idea of the life of the hunting and fishing peoples. The implements vary in shape and mostly are made of different kinds of stone; those of later periods are more skillfully made. Rock carvings have been found, usually near hunting and fishing grounds. They represent game such as deer, reindeer, elk, bears, birds, seals, whales, and fish (especially salmon and halibut), all of which were vital to the way of life of the coastal peoples. The carvings at Alta in Finnmark, the largest in Scandinavia, were made at sea level continuously from 6200 to 2500 BC and mark the progression of the land as it rose from the sea after the last ice age.
 

Copyright 1994-2002 Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Anons
 
New materials
Bjornstjerne Bjornson
Edvard Grieg
Knut Hamsun
Sigrid Undset
Year in Review 2001: world-affairs
 
Links
 
Partners


[an error occurred while processing this directive]
 
History
Top
Project & support: Orlov Iaroslav
Contact:
THE NORGE.RU 2000-2009. All rights reserved
Legal information Information On server